Censorship to Hide Crimes Against Humanity in USA

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Friday, June 5, 2015

Preface for "Bloody Toombs"

Toombs and Appling Counties as seen on 
the Altamaha River in Southeast Georgia

BLOODY TOOMBS
Memoir and Allegory
by Bob Darby

Preface, by Mary Neal

"Bloody Toombs" is the autobiographical work of Bob Darby, a lifelong human rights activist. Darby came of age as a privileged Caucasian in the segregated South during the civil rights era. America was engulfed in a war at home as well as the Vietnam War, the last military conflict when young men were drafted. Darby's stance against racism and the war created a rift between himself and some of his closest relatives and friends in his Toombs County, Georgia home town. Darby says Toombs County was called "Bloody Toombs" because of its alleged lawlessness and violence, often of a racial nature. 

When Darby graduated from Emory University and enrolled at Ivy League schools in the East—Harvard and Tufts—he found many comrades who shared his admiration for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Freedom Riders as well as his dedication to the anti-war movement. Darby embraced the freedom of the late 1960’s, studied hard to excel in his classes, and was very proud to find a paid position as an anti-war activist in California. Few of Darby’s friends realized that the crusading anti-racism, anti-war activist was also fighting a very personal war to ignore the beckoning red clay grave he imagined waiting for him in Georgia. The sensitive and brilliant young man’s manic depression sometimes led to wild exuberance and other times to suicidal thoughts and attempts to end his life.

This is the first edition of “Bloody Toombs” to be offered publicly. It omits the original Chapter One, wherein Darby described incestuous sexual assaults he was forced to endure as a pubescent boy, which he blames for triggering his bipolar disorder. Despite Darby’s challenges, or perhaps because of them, he rejected the teachings of his conservative, elite background to become a man with tremendous empathy for downtrodden people. Darby’s life is one of service as a civil rights advocate, peace activist, and the founder of Food Not Bombs in Atlanta. “Bloody Toombs” proves that Darby is also a masterful writer who makes one feel the excitement of his adventures, his passion for social justice, and his quest for normalcy.

“Bloody Toombs” is an allegory as well as a memoir in that it deals with social and ethical issues of universal importance. It brings to mind other books that follow the main characters through exciting periods in American life allowing one to observe history according to their experiences: “Forrest Gump” and “Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters’ First 100 Years.” All three well-told stories influence our way of thinking. "Having Our Say" traced two African American sisters from Reconstruction to the 1990's. Forrest Gump's experiences took readers through periods of momentous changes just as Darby does in his memoir, including the civil rights movement and Vietnam War era as well as America's hippie years. "Bloody Toombs" also illustrates how mental illness has been dealt with over time.

Darby never forgot being homeless for brief periods when he experienced mental health crises and has arranged for sales of “Bloody Toombs” to help give Assistance to the Incarcerated Mentally Ill. "Bloody Toombs" will soon be available for order as books and ebooks. This article will be updated when it goes on sale. We thank you in advance.


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MaryLovesJustice blog features authors whose books deal with justice issues or matters of social justice concern. Our featured authors for June and July 2015 have been selected. Can you suggest someone for August? To suggest a book and author, please leave a comment with your email address or phone number below, or contact MaryLovesJustice, director of "Human Rights Demand" channel at Blogtalkradio, Assistance to the Incarcerated Mentally Ill, the Human Rights for Prisoners March, and the Davis-MacPhail Truth Committee (an anti-DP org). The phone number is in the top margin of the blogs or the signature blocks. Books selected are featured in a MaryLovesJustice article, and authors are interviewed at "Human Rights Demand" Blogtalkradio channel, exposing their work to a wide audience of human and civil rights advocates.
Radio schedule
http://MLJradio.blogspot.com
Website: Wrongful Death of Larry Neal
http://WrongfulDeathofLarryNeal.com/main.html
Email address MaryLovesJustice@gmail.com
Phone numbers (678)531.0262 or (571)335-1741

1 comment:

  1. Repeat of the article: Preface for Bloody Toombs
    (photo)
    Toombs and Appling Counties as seen on
    the Altamaha River in Southeast Georgia

    BLOODY TOOMBS
    Memoir and Allegory
    by Bob Darby

    Preface, by Mary Neal

    "Bloody Toombs" is the autobiographical work of Bob Darby, a lifelong human rights activist. Darby came of age as a privileged Caucasian in the segregated South during the civil rights era. America was engulfed in a war at home as well as the Vietnam War, the last military conflict when young men were drafted. Darby's stance against racism and the war created a rift between himself and some of his closest friends in his small hometown in Toombs County, Georgia. Darby says Toombs County was called "Bloody Toombs" because of its alleged lawlessness and violence, often of a racial nature.

    When Darby graduated from Emory University and enrolled at Ivy League schools in the East—Harvard and Tufts—he found many comrades who shared his admiration for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Freedom Riders as well as his dedication to the anti-war movement. Darby embraced the freedom of the late 1960’s, studied hard to excel in his classes, and was very proud to find a paid position as an anti-war activist in California. Few of Darby’s friends realized that the crusading anti-racism, anti-war activist was also fighting a very personal war to ignore the beckoning red clay grave he imagined waiting for him in Georgia. The sensitive and brilliant young man’s manic depression sometimes led to wild exuberance and other times to suicidal thoughts and attempts to end his life.

    This is the first edition of “Bloody Toombs” to be offered publicly. It omits the original Chapter One, wherein Darby described incestuous sexual assaults he was forced to endure as a pubescent boy, which he blames for triggering his bipolar disorder. Despite Darby’s challenges, or perhaps because of them, he rejected the teachings of his conservative, elite background to become a man with tremendous empathy for downtrodden people. Darby’s life is one of service as a civil rights advocate, peace activist, and the founder of Food Not Bombs in Atlanta. “Bloody Toombs” proves that Darby is also a masterful writer who makes one feel a part of his adventures, his passion for social justice, and his quest for normalcy.

    “Bloody Toombs” is an allegory as well as a memoir in that it deals with social and ethical issues of universal importance. It brings to mind other books that follow the main characters through exciting periods in American life allowing one to observe history according to their experiences: “Forrest Gump” and “Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters’ First 100 Years.” All three well-told stories influence our way of thinking. "Having Our Say" traced two African American sisters from Reconstruction to the 1990's. Forrest Gump's experiences took readers through the same time periods of momentous changes that Darby does in his memoir, including the civil rights movement and Vietnam War era as well as America's hippie years. "Bloody Toombs" also illustrates how mental illness has been dealt with over time.

    Darby never forgot being homeless for brief periods when he experienced mental health crises and has arranged for sales of “Bloody Toombs” to help give Assistance to the Incarcerated Mentally Ill. "Bloody Toombs" will soon be available for order as books and ebooks.
    (photo)

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